Vocations Team

Vocations Team

Sr. Nuala Kelly

The theme for the 400th anniversary is “to welcome the stranger.” In my present ministry I am fortunate to have many opportunities to welcome the stranger whether it’s someone who has been living on the streets of Belfast and have come to our hostel or who has come from another country and have found themselves homeless.
When Depaul International came to Ireland in 2002 I became a member of the Trustee Board and have been on it since then. In 2005 they came to Belfast. When I retired from school I became a full time volunteer with the organisation.
Most of my time is spent visiting the three hostels in Belfast, two family hostels for young homeless mothers and a “wet” hostel for homeless alcoholic men and women. In the latter I spend many hours chatting and listening to the residents, who through no fault of their own have lost family, home and friends. I visit them in hospital or prison and organise religious services at various times of the year and when a resident dies.
Fortunately, many residents get their own flats and I visit them regularly or meet them in town for coffee. Loneliness is a real problem for someone who moves from a hostel and befriending them is very necessary. They also have my mobile number and can ring for a chat at any time. Occasionally I visit the projects in Dungannon and Derry.
My life is very fulfilled and I count myself lucky to be part of Depaul, their Philosophy of Care statement reads:
“Welcome.
We are glad you are here.
In this place you can take steps towards a better future.
You will lead the way.
We will ask, listen and help.
We will work and walk with you.
Welcome”
I hope I make our service users feel welcome wherever they have come from.


Sr Marguerite Buckley

I am Marguerite Buckley, the third child of seven, born to Kate and Michael Buckley near Macroom, Co Cork.
My first contact with the Daughters of Charity was when Catherine my eldest sister was a student in St Mary’s School of Home Economics in Dunmanway, Co Cork. When Catherine completed her year there, she chose to enter the community.
I followed her to St Mary’s School the next year and my path led me to train as a nurse in St Vincent’s psychiatric hospital, in Fairview, Dublin. It was here that the first idea of joining the Daughters of Charity became a possibility.
I was impressed by the sisters, by the care they gave the patients, they seemed very normal, as they went about their duties and interacted with patients, nurses and relatives. The care was very personal, sensitive, with lots of fun as we helped them provide a holistic program of care, during my training there. As students we were encouraged to take a lot of guided responsibility in ward management and other duties.
In my personal live, it was also a time of social development and maturity. In the time we had off we explored the sights of Dublin and I enjoyed time with my family. I entered the Daughters when I was 21 years of age.
To my joy when I had completed my formation I returned to work in St Vincent’s Hospital for a number of years. During over 30 years there I was engaged in many aspects of care given there.
For some years I have been involved in Counselling and in Parish Work. My experience of my life as a Daughter has been filled with many blessings, much contentment, personal development, joys, and challenges.
Would I change it? NO